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Librello publishing house


Librello is an innovative open access academic publishing house based in Basel, Switzerland. Working on a membership basis, we decouple the payment from the publication and can afford a rigorous single-blind peer review process with no economic pressure. Authors are able to submit an unlimited number of manuscripts to all open access journals through an annual flat fee.

Latest publications

JoHS
John-Andrew McNeish 1, * , Arturo Matute 2 , Erika Rojas Ospina 1 and Hugo Frühling 3
1 Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
2 Department of International Development Studies, University of the Valley of Guatemala, Guatemala City, Guatemala
3 Institute of Public Affairs, University of Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 5 July 2022
 
Abstract: In this article we discuss the comparative impact and significance of Community-Oriented Policing (COP) in Central America (Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua). We emphasize in particular the formal role of COP as a means to re-establish trust between the state and community, demonstrate professionalism and to evidence the democratic accountability of the police to the population. Although these formal goals remain the goal of community oriented policing, we demonstrate in this article that there has been an increased emphasis on more kinetic or militarized forms of policing in recent years. Hard handed, heavily armed and interventionist police policies have spread from El Salvador to Guatemala, and more recently Nicaragua. Moves towards more aggressive policing are explained by governments and police forces as a necessary response to the rising threat of gangs and drug cartels and horrifying levels of homicide statistics. However, as we highlight there is also evidence of these changes reflecting undemocratic shifts within national administrations and the repositioning of people within government and national institutions with links to these countries' earlier military governments.The net effect of these changes we argue is to erode the intentions of COP initiatives, and severely reduce levels of trust and accountability between people and the democratic state.

CiS
Louis Maximilian Ronalter 1, * , Camila Fabrício Poltronieri 2 , Mateus Cecilio Gerolamo 3 and Merce Bernardo 1
1 Department of Business, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
2 Production Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil
3 Department of Production Engineering, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 23 June 2022
 
Abstract: Companies worldwide strive to become more sustainable, and, in this context, the circular economy (CE) gains importance as alternative system as opposed to the linear economy. Since executive mangers around the world work with management systems (MSs) to guide and improve organizational operations, this work aims to explore how integrated MSs (IMS) as business tools can contribute to the adoption of CE principles at the corporate level. To achieve this objective, a systematic literature review is performed, which results in a synthesis sample of 18 academic papers. The findings reveal how MSs contribute to CE adoption and, therefore, demonstrate that managers can use IMS to foster CE implementation. In addition, the findings highlight the importance of institutional intervention in the transition from a linear towards a circular designed economy. The paper contributes to academia by linking the concepts of IMS and CE, synthesizing the current academic knowledge at hand, and proposing a comprehensive research agenda that sets the path for future academic investigations. In a practical perspective, the paper contributes also to managers since it emphasizes how IMS can be used to incorporate circular business thinking into operations management.

 
Abstract: Investing in different futures is an existential challenge that much research within and adjacent to Ecological Economics engages with, yet organizations that recognize this social ecological imperative have few options for funding and implementing radical transformations to the needs and well-being provisioning systems that currently exist. Ecological macroeconomic ideas and EE principles of long term well being and justice on a livable planet will be explored in the context of the housing crisis in Canada, and a rural Ontario community organization attempting to find transformative solutions to the lived, local experience of this crisis. Provisioning systems for housing, when tied to real estate markets, debt money creation, land enclosures, and financialized supply chains, contribute to capital accumulation cycles; it is hardly possible to meet our housing needs, in aggregate, without also perpetuating the form of this provisioning system. The idea presented here, that of Capital Sequestration, proposes to remove capital from markets and `invests' this capital in land trusts as an intentional transformation of financial capital into social and ecological values. Through land and housing trusts as well as non-market funding pathways, Capital Sequestration is a method of investing in the transformation of provisioning systems through the sustained and collective boundary management of financial markets and incommensurable values. This practice offers significant promise as it applies ecological macroeconomic theory work, is grounded in the normative goals of and emerges from empirical research of EE, and meets a pressing need within society for imagining alternative economies.

OF
On-farm Research to Diversify Organic Farming Systems
doi: 10.12924/of2022.08010001 | Organic Farming | 2022 | Volume 8 | Issue 1
Moritz Reckling 1, 2, * and Meike Grosse 3
1 Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research, Müncheberg, Germany
2 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden
3 Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Frick, Switzerland
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 14 June 2022
 
Abstract:

Diversification of organic farming systems is a key practice to address current challenges in crop and livestock production. It has the potential to increase the resilience to climate fluctuations and counteracts climate change to some extent by reducing emissions and increasing carbon storage. Diversified crop-livestock systems can also contribute to stop the dramatic loss of biodiversity. Organic farms are already more often mixed crop-livestock farms with more diverse crop rotations, including perennial leys, compared to conventional farms [1]. However, there is a need as well as potential for further increasing diversity on organic farms [2].


CiS
Systems Dynamics Model of SDGs: A Case Study of Iran
doi: 10.12924/cis2022.10010003 | Challenges in Sustainability | 2022 | Volume 10 | Issue 1
Mojgan Chapariha
Lisbon School of Economics and Management (ISEG), University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Publication Date: 6 May 2022
 
Abstract:

This paper investigates on the implementation Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Iran. It generates a systems dynamics model for exploring possibilities for achieving four SDGs: SDG-1 (eradicating poverty), SDG-8 (economic growth and decent work), SDG-12 (sustainable production and consumption), and SDG-13 (climate action) in Iran. The model is used to generate four possible stories about the implementation of measures to achieve these SDGs in the future of the Iranian economy from 2020 to 2050: 1) the Scenario of Business as Usual continues current trends and projects them into the future, 2) the Scenario of Inclusive Growth is designed to simulate more income equality and faster economic growth, 3) the Scenario of a Steady State introduces measures to improve social, and environmental aspects while having zero economic growth, and 4) the Scenario of Well-being for People and Planet is designed to improve socio-economic and environmental aspects of the Iranian economy to achieve the four SDGs in Iran. The performance of the Iranian economy for progressing towards the SDGs is monitored through four SDG indexes which are measured based on the arithmetic mean of selected indicators for each SDG, and a Combined Index of SDGs which is measured based on the arithmetic mean of the four SDGs indexes. The results of the simulations of the SDGs model of Iran shows that the transformational scenarios (Steady State, and Well-being for People and Planet) provide better pathways in comparison to conventional scenarios (Business as Usual and Inclusive Growth) for achieving the SDGs. Moreover, this study find that transformational policy changes and extraordinary efforts are required for progress in achieving SDGs in Iran.


CiS
Christopher J Orr 1, * and Katie Kish 2, 3
1 Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
2 Ecological Footprint Initiative, York University, Toronto, Canada
3 Editor-in-Chief of Challenges in Sustainability, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 5 April 2022
 
Abstract: We are pleased to introduce the third special issue in Challenges in Sustainability entitled Sustainability transformations: Emerging pathways toward safe and just futures for people and the planet.

JoHS
Luca Guido Valla 1, 2
1 Department of Cognitive Science, Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta
2 “Mihai Viteazul” National Intelligence Academy, Bucharest, Romania
Publication Date: 31 March 2022
 
Abstract: In the last few decades, the classical concept of national security as related predominantly to military aspects has given way to new elements of analysis. New sectors and actors in the framework of national security took the stage. Starting from the evolution of the concept of national security, this article presents the modalities through which citizens’ perceptions of security issues have been studied to date. Moreover, it proposes a new approach for the exploration of this subject, which could take into account dimensions such as emotional responses to national security threats, which have been rarely systematically investigated.

JoHS
Suyani Indriastuti 1 , Abubakar Eby Hara 2, * , Himawan Bayu Patriadi 3 , Agus Trihartono 2 and Bagus Sigit Sunarko 2
1 Centre for Sustainable Human Security, University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
2 Department of International Relations, University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
3 Centre for Reseach in Social Sciences and Humanities (C-RiSSH), University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 9 February 2022
 
Abstract: It is widely accepted that tobacco is a threat to public health security. Anti-tobacco norms are intensively campaigned by international agencies, such as World Health Organisation (WHO) and non-government organisations (NGOs). Indonesia has not signed and ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC); however, Indonesian legislation obligates government agencies such as ministries, universities, and the local government to control tobacco use. Meanwhile, tobacco remains one of the central sources of income for Indonesia's state and local economies, a reality that is especially salient for tobacco farmers and labourers. This study aims to examine the extent to which Indonesia internalises the anti-tobacco norm. We focused our investigation on features including norm internalisation and human security, with specific attention to economic and health security. Our study revealed notable ambivalence in the internalisation of tobacco norms in Indonesia. This ambivalence reflects conflictual interests over economic and health security and ambiguity in policymaking concerning tobacco control. Using a qualitative approach, the authors of this study gathered primary data via in-depth interviews and FGD with knowledgeable stakeholders, such as government officials, NGO representatives, health agency workers, farmers, smokers, and academics, and integrated this data with support from the relevant literature. The findings of the present study enrich the existing discussion on norm internalisation, particularly as it relates to tobacco control and other controversial norms.

JoHS
Editorial vol. 18 (2022)
doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18010001 | Journal of Human Security | 2022 | Volume 18 | Issue 1
Sabina Lautensach 1, 2
1 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Human Security, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Human Security Institute, Canada
Publication Date: 9 February 2022
 
Abstract:

Around the world an increasing shortage of good governance seems to have taken hold. It manifests in the increasing shortfalls on the Sustainable Development Goals and in the worsening polycrisis of the Anthropocene. The UN Secretary-General urged the international community for more infusion of scientifically authoritative models into governance, as well as more collaboration and inclusion of scientists. That goal is not easily achieved in this age of rising kakistocracies.

 


JoHS
A Systematic Literature Review of Gendered Human Security Approaches
doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010091 | Journal of Human Security | 2021 | Volume 17 | Issue 1
Theresa A. Ammann 1, * and Tamara A. Kool 2, 3
1 Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University, Højbjerg, Denmark
2 Maastricht Graduate School of Governance, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3 Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology, United Nations University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 23 December 2021
 
Abstract: While many have argued for Human Security to integrate a gendered perspective, there is a lack of a consistent approach which hampers the transformative potential that otherwise could be achieved. To better understand how gender has been incorporated in relation to gender, we therefore conducted a systematic review of the literature that combined feminist approaches and Human Security from 1994 (Human Security's inception) to June 2018. In exploring this literature, the following questions were addressed: (a) How is criticism and support of Human Security framed in feminist research? (b) How are gender and feminist research (values) defined in relation to Human Security? (c) Which feminist approaches to Human Security are taken? (d) How do these feminist approaches dismiss or support Human Security and which trends emerge? We found that most studies solely focus on integrating women in the Human Security debate, while men, masculinities, and/or causes of structural inequalities and insecurities remain unaddressed. Studies that address structural inequalities and discuss both men and women come from critical feminist and intersectional backgrounds. We conclude that most gendered approaches to Human Security still need to fully incorporate feminist approaches to be able to truly challenge global gendered inequalities and insecurities.



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