Volume 17, Issue 1 (2021)

Editorial  
Editorial Volume 17
pp. 1-3
doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010001 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Sabina Lautensach 1, 2, 3
1 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Human Security, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Human Security Institute, Canada
3 University of Northern British Columbia, Terrace, BC, V8G 4A2, Canada
Publication Date: 19 February 2021
Abstract: A retrospective on the year 2020 suggests that the CoViD-19 pandemic can and should be interpreted as a multidimensional learning opportunity.

doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010004 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Arry Bainus 1, * , Wawan Budi Darmawan 1 , Dina Yulianti 1 and Luthfi Hamzah Husin 1
1 Padjadjaran University, Sumedang, Indonesia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 19 February 2021
Abstract: This article offers an empirical finding of human security issues in Citarum River, Indonesia, which was once labelled as the dirtiest and most polluted river in the world. Using a theoretical framework based on actor-based security model, this research seeks to analyse a local community's experience in a village affected by severe environmental degradation of its river basin and its relation to other actors in security policy making process. The article explores how a local people evaluate the ongoing environmental degradation and its impacts to their life. This analysis leads to the finding that local people are aware of the threats from their environment, but at the same time they still have to depend on the economic activities that has been polluting the river. This condition makes them unable to advocate for what they experienced to the policy makers and choose to be resilient. On the other hand, the government's policies tend to ignore the perspective of the local community in formulating a security policy. This supports previous studies that the concept of human security still has little impact on addressing environmental issues, especially at policy level.

 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010015 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Publication Date: 9 July 2021
Abstract:

COVID-19 has elevated anew the import of holistically conceiving human-environmental well-being and tackling the overarching precarities of our ecologies, societies and public health in strategies of securitization. This paper considers the key challenge of reimagining securitization in the aftermath of COVID-19 and makes two core arguments. The first is that in addressing precarity a key starting point lies in being mindful of how it is differentially experienced across multiple social hierarchies in the human world. The paper draws upon Judith Butler’s work on ‘frames of seeing’ to consider how our current moment can elicit a contrapuntal concern for those who have always been precarious but not in view. The second core argument is that it is vital to move beyond a concern for human precarity to a concern for a broader sense of planetary precarity, which in turn prompts the need to strategize for a ‘more-than-human’ sense of security. Developing the concept of ‘human security’, the paper reflects on how we can usefully envision a ‘more-than-human security’ for a more biologically stable and sustainable planet.


 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010023 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Ardli Johan Kusuma 1, * , Firman Firman 2 , Ahmad Harakan 3 , M. Chairil Akbar Setiawan 4 , Dodi Faedlulloh 5 and Komang Jaka Ferdian 6
1 Department of Political Science, Universitas Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
2 Department of Public Administration, Universitas 17 Agustus 1945 Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
3 Department of Government Studies, Universitas Muhammadiyah Makassar, Makassar, Indonesia
4 Department of International Relations, Universitas Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
5 Department of Public Administration, Universitas Lampung, Bandar Lampung, Indonesia
6 Departmen of Political Science, Universitas Bangka Belitung, Bangka Belitung, Indonesia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 26 July 2021
Abstract:

The present study discusses the role of NGOs in the efforts of the Indonesian Humanitarian Alliance for Myanmar (AKIM: Aliansi Kemanusian Indonesia Untuk Myanmar) to handle the humanitarian crisis experienced by Ethnic Rohingya groups in Myanmar in 2017. This phenomenon in Myanmar began to draw a lot of attention when the AKIM was able to contribute to the cause even though state actors and IGO attempts were blocked by the Myanmar government. In this case, NGOs were able to play a role outside the traditional structure of modern international relations that was inaccessible to state or international organizations (IGOs) or state governments. This phenomenon indicates that NGOs have more access to attempts to settle the humanitarian crisis being experienced by the ethnic Rohingya groups in Myanmar. This is notable because the Myanmar government has blocked the aid of other countries and IGOs and has denied the assistance offered by the United Nations. The qualitative method was used in this study, employing a case study model to observe the effects that occurred. During data collection researchers, used study documents, and then the data was processed through interpretive analytical techniques to draw conclusions and formulate a model for the study.


ISSN: 1835-3800
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