ISSN: 1835-3800 doi: 10.12924/librello.JoHS

We are committed to a multidisciplinary approach to security analysis. Our associates contribute expertise from such diverse areas as political anthropology, international relations, environmental science, ethics, health care, psychology, economics, and engineering.

The Journal of Human Security (JoHS; ISSN 1835-3800) brings together expertise from universities worldwide and facilitates communication and collaboration between researchers, practitioners and educators. Beyond the academy, the Journal of Human Security aims to connect people interested in all aspects of human security.

Objectives & Aims

The goal of Journal of Human Security is to disseminate applied research into a secure and sustainable future for humanity. It continues the Australasian Journal of Human SecurityJournal of Human Security endeavours to:

  • Provide a forum for researchers to foster interdisciplinary inquiry in broad human security issues such as track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, terrorism, religious extremism, human rights, demographic change, population health, human ecology, sustainable economics and related areas;
  • Inform readers about upcoming events, ongoing and new research projects, trends and discussions, newly published monographs, and available scholarships;
  • Encourage a multidisciplinary approach to issues that have traditionally been viewed as mostly unidisciplinary;
  • Maintain an appeal to a wide readership with both high academic standards and close relevance to practice;
  • Meet international standards of excellence.

Previous content:

In 2013 Librello started hosting the publications of the Journal of Human Security. For the previous content of the journal please use the following links:

2012 Journal of Human Security (Open Access)
2007-2011 Journal of Human Security (at RMIT University Press; pay-per-view)
2005-2006 Australasian Journal of Human Security (at Egan-Reid; pay-per-view)


Latest publications

doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010035 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Dorota Domalewska 1, * , Małgorzata Gawlik-Kobylińska 2 , Phuong Hoang Yen 3 , Rebecca K. Webb 4 and Nakonthep Thiparasuparat 4
1 Faculty of National Security, War Studies University, Warsaw, Poland
2 Faculty of Management and Command, War Studies University, Warsaw, Poland
3 Department of English Language and Culture, Can Tho University, Can Tho, Vietnam
4 Faculty of Liberal Arts, Rangsit University, Rangsit, Thailand
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 25 August 2021
Abstract:

Safe space describes a classroom climate that feels secure, supportive, and risk-free so that students can honestly express their individuality and opinions without fear of being the target of violence harassment, or hate speech. In this paper, we examine the relationship between the school environment, individual characteristics and family in shaping students’ perceptions of safe learning environment. The Safe Learning Environment Survey was designed and distributed to a convenience sample of 360 undergraduate students at universities in Poland and Vietnam. Results reveal that neither sex nor family context affect students’ feeling of safety at school. However, there is a high association with nationality in feeling safe at school. Polish and Vietnamese students differ in their opinions why safe space should be enhanced as well as what the teacher and peers’ roles are in shaping safe atmospheres. These findings have significant implications for multicultural classes: understanding the factors that enhance school safety will help to form the collaborative and inclusive environment where students’ performance improves.



doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010023 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Ardli Johan Kusuma 1, * , Firman Firman 2 , Ahmad Harakan 3 , M. Chairil Akbar Setiawan 4 , Dodi Faedlulloh 5 and Komang Jaka Ferdian 6
1 Department of Political Science, Universitas Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
2 Department of Public Administration, Universitas 17 Agustus 1945 Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
3 Department of Government Studies, Universitas Muhammadiyah Makassar, Makassar, Indonesia
4 Department of International Relations, Universitas Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
5 Department of Public Administration, Universitas Lampung, Bandar Lampung, Indonesia
6 Departmen of Political Science, Universitas Bangka Belitung, Bangka Belitung, Indonesia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 26 July 2021
Abstract:

The present study discusses the role of NGOs in the efforts of the Indonesian Humanitarian Alliance for Myanmar (AKIM: Aliansi Kemanusian Indonesia Untuk Myanmar) to handle the humanitarian crisis experienced by Ethnic Rohingya groups in Myanmar in 2017. This phenomenon in Myanmar began to draw a lot of attention when the AKIM was able to contribute to the cause even though state actors and IGO attempts were blocked by the Myanmar government. In this case, NGOs were able to play a role outside the traditional structure of modern international relations that was inaccessible to state or international organizations (IGOs) or state governments. This phenomenon indicates that NGOs have more access to attempts to settle the humanitarian crisis being experienced by the ethnic Rohingya groups in Myanmar. This is notable because the Myanmar government has blocked the aid of other countries and IGOs and has denied the assistance offered by the United Nations. The qualitative method was used in this study, employing a case study model to observe the effects that occurred. During data collection researchers, used study documents, and then the data was processed through interpretive analytical techniques to draw conclusions and formulate a model for the study.


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010015 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Publication Date: 9 July 2021
Abstract:

COVID-19 has elevated anew the import of holistically conceiving human-environmental well-being and tackling the overarching precarities of our ecologies, societies and public health in strategies of securitization. This paper considers the key challenge of reimagining securitization in the aftermath of COVID-19 and makes two core arguments. The first is that in addressing precarity a key starting point lies in being mindful of how it is differentially experienced across multiple social hierarchies in the human world. The paper draws upon Judith Butler’s work on ‘frames of seeing’ to consider how our current moment can elicit a contrapuntal concern for those who have always been precarious but not in view. The second core argument is that it is vital to move beyond a concern for human precarity to a concern for a broader sense of planetary precarity, which in turn prompts the need to strategize for a ‘more-than-human’ sense of security. Developing the concept of ‘human security’, the paper reflects on how we can usefully envision a ‘more-than-human security’ for a more biologically stable and sustainable planet.


 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.16020149 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 2
Shai Andre Divon
Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Ås, Norway
Publication Date: 23 June 2021
Abstract:

In 2017 the Uganda Police Force (UPF) issued a Strategy for Community Policing (COP). The aim of the strategy is to provide a framework for the operationalisation of COP in the country. COP in Uganda is viewed both as a philosophy and an organisational strategy aiming at promoting new partnerships between the police and the community. This research examines how the UPF applies the COP strategy in Gulu Uganda to create new partnerships between the police and the community as part of the preparation for transforming Gulu into a city in Uganda. Anchored in qualitative research conducted in 2018–2019 in Gulu municipality, we examined COP in theory and practice. We fleshed out the different COP interventions installed by the police, observed how these applications of COP are perceived by the community and local leadership, and evaluated the extent to which these applications and perceptions contribute to creating new partnerships between the police and the public, as well as how these constitute an operationalisation of the UPF strategy for COP. There are several interventions labelled as COP in Gulu, including joint patrols, Mayumba Kumi, sensitisation activities, and partnerships with NGOs. Most of these applications are ‘old wine in new bottles’ and do not qualify as attempts to create new partnerships between the police and the public. In linkage to the mode of governance exercised by the Government of Uganda, the data collected indicates that the public at large still views the police as a corrupt, unpredictable, and a violent force that serves the interests of elites rather than a public service. As long as the police is viewed in such a way, it is difficult to create meaningful partnerships between the police and the public, and subsequently it becomes difficult to successfully apply the UPF COP strategy.


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.16020134 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 2
Ingrid L.P. Nyborg 1, * and Bahadar Nawab 2
1 Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
2 Department of Development Studies, COMSATS University Islamabad (CUI), Abbottabad Campus, Pakistan
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 7 June 2021
Abstract:

This paper explores the transition from military to civil security in post-militancy and subsequent militant operations in 2009 and the floods of 2010 in the Swat Valley of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), Pakistan. Based mainly on qualitative interviews with local police and community women and men, the paper examines the shifting roles of the police over the course of these crises and how community-police relations are continuously negotiated.  Before the conflict, relations between the community and police were weak, and traditional institutions such as the jirga were functioning. Militants attacked both systems, targeting police, politicians, jirga leaders and education institutions. Following the military operation, the responsibility for security became a confusing institutional landscape of civil and military actors, which has reshaped community-police relations in Swat. Dichotomous distinctions between state and non-state, formal and informal institutions fall short in describing the everyday dynamic crafting of local institutions, particularly in a post-conflict context like Swat. New ‘hybrid’ institutions have emerged, initiated by both government and communities, with varying degrees of success in building trust and addressing peoples’ fears that militants may return. The results are relevant for both post-conflict development assistance and police and justice reform not only in the study area, but also in other post-conflict areas where states and communities find themselves re-negotiating their basic relationships.


View more publications...



ISSN: 1835-3800
2012 - 2021 Librello, Switzerland.