ISSN: 1835-3800 doi: 10.12924/librello.JoHS

We are committed to a multidisciplinary approach to security analysis. Our associates contribute expertise from such diverse areas as political anthropology, international relations, environmental science, ethics, health care, psychology, economics, and engineering.

The Journal of Human Security (JoHS; ISSN 1835-3800) brings together expertise from universities worldwide and facilitates communication and collaboration between researchers, practitioners and educators. Beyond the academy, the Journal of Human Security aims to connect people interested in all aspects of human security.

Objectives & Aims

The goal of Journal of Human Security is to disseminate applied research into a secure and sustainable future for humanity. It continues the Australasian Journal of Human SecurityJournal of Human Security endeavours to:

  • Provide a forum for researchers to foster interdisciplinary inquiry in broad human security issues such as track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, terrorism, religious extremism, human rights, demographic change, population health, human ecology, sustainable economics and related areas;
  • Inform readers about upcoming events, ongoing and new research projects, trends and discussions, newly published monographs, and available scholarships;
  • Encourage a multidisciplinary approach to issues that have traditionally been viewed as mostly unidisciplinary;
  • Maintain an appeal to a wide readership with both high academic standards and close relevance to practice;
  • Meet international standards of excellence.

Previous content:

In 2013 Librello started hosting the publications of the Journal of Human Security. For the previous content of the journal please use the following links:

2012 Journal of Human Security (Open Access)
2007-2011 Journal of Human Security (at RMIT University Press; pay-per-view)
2005-2006 Australasian Journal of Human Security (at Egan-Reid; pay-per-view)


Latest publications

doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010051 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Paul Bellamy
New Zealand Parliamentary Service, Parliament, Wellington
Views 56
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Publication Date: 24 November 2020
Abstract: Ultimately, the editors and contributors achieve their goal of making an important contribution to the subject area. They illuminate various aspects of the interdependencies between migration, environmental and resource conflicts, along with the development and roles of national, regional and global migration governance regimes. Added value is provided by chapters including extensive and helpful bibliographies, identifying areas requiring more research, and often displaying illustrative figures and tables. Environmental Conflicts, Migration and Governance is a well-researched and written book. It is founded on a perceptive analysis of an important topic that warrants discussion, and will become increasingly important in the forthcoming years.

doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010041 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Radosław Korneć
Department of Social Sciences, Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Siedlce, Poland
Views 128
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Publication Date: 10 November 2020
Abstract: Compared to issues related to the economy, politics, social or military concerns, attempts to preserve ecology and the natural environment have a relatively short history. Anthropogenic environmental changes in many cases have a direct impact on one's quality of life and the functioning of urban centers, states and communities. Pressure exerted by human economic activity on the environment is demonstrated, above all, by reductions in air, water, and soil quality, worse acoustic climate, and limited access to green spaces. The most detrimental undertakings have a negative impact on the level of ecological security in cities are transport, domestic heating of buildings, industrial activities, and heating processes. The main goal of this paper is to identify the perception of the ecological security of the residents of the biggest urban centers. Urban environment security is a very broad issue. It covers both natural phenomena, where human impact is minimal, levels of urban sustainable development and attitudes of the city dwellers. Recently, citizen awareness of the importance of environmental challenges in Polish cities’ development has surged, including awareness of the desire to live in a cleaner environment and to breathe clean air. The topic is more and more often discussed in public debate, above all during periods of peak contaminant concentrations. The situation serves as a stimulus for citizens to mobilize, often through various social movements while local governments take actions oriented at changing methods of domestic heating, more eco-friendly mobility and the enhanced environmental education of society.

doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010030 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Cameron David Carlson 1, * , Troy J Bouffard 1 and Dana Woodward 1
1 Homeland Security and Emergency Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, AK, USA
* Corresponding author
Views 702
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Publication Date: 1 September 2020
Abstract: Changes in the U.S. Arctic are challenging both the national and human security dynamics of the region. Historically, the region’s significance had been defined by national security concerns, but the emerging concept of human security has come to provide a useful framework through which to define and demonstrate the nexus between the two. This paper provides an overview of the relationship between national and human security and the concerns shared by individuals working in both areas, with a more narrowed focus on the interrelated issues of both food and energy security within the U.S. Arctic. Considering the substantial overlap of aspects of food and energy on both national as well as human security, an analysis of the relationships involving each provides meaningful and extended context of the term “security” for the Arctic region.

doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010016 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Anne Speckhard 1 , Molly Ellenberg 1, * , Haider Shaghati 1 and Neima Izadi 1
1 The International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism, Washington, DC, USA
* Corresponding author
Views 780
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Publication Date: 20 August 2020
Abstract: Despite the territorial demise of Islamic State of Iraq and Syria [ISIS], their cyberoperations continue to entice supporters. In an effort to disrupt ISIS’s appeal, the International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism has produced over 150 short video clips featuring ISIS insiders denouncing the group, published in over 100 Facebook campaigns in multiple languages and regions. This article details 16 campaigns hyper-targeted at profiles that, based on predetermined and assessed indicators, suggested increased risk of exposure to ISIS-related content. Qualitative and quantitative metrics possibly suggest positive changes in online attitudes and behavior, reducing support and incitement to terrorism.

doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16020055 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 2
Qasim Ali Shah 1 , Bahadar Nawab 1, * , Ingrid Nyborg 2 and Noor Elahi 1
1 Department of Development Studies, COMSATS University Islamabad (CUI), Abbottabad Campus, Pakistan
2 Department of International Environment and Development Studies-Noragric, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Norway
* Corresponding author
Views 1015
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Publication Date: 12 August 2020
Abstract: Unlike other faith-based conflicts, the militancy in Swat seems unique, as militants used religion for promoting their agenda and giving voices to the grievances of the poor people through a popular narrative likely without knowing narratology. Using narratives and narratology as a theoretical framework, this qualitative study is an effort to understand the essence of militants' narrative in Swat and the mechanism through which they steered it up until the time it gained verisimilitude. Conducting 73 semi-structured interviews, the study finds that it was a planned strategy of the militants that popularized them in Swat, while they later lost this support due to their atrocities against general populace. The militants used the socially and culturally constructed narrative through FM radio and motivated the masses to follow their ideology and brand of Islamic Sharia. The study concludes that the formulation and popularization of social narratives play vital roles in social movements and conflicts to muster popular support for promoting vested interests that can be used against the state and general public.

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ISSN: 1835-3800
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