Volume 16, Issue 1 (2020)


Editorial  
Editorial 2020
pp. 1-2
doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010001 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Sabina Lautensach 1, 2, 3
1 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Human Security, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Human Security Institute, Canada
3 University of Northern British Columbia, Terrace, BC, V8G 4A2, Canada
Views 788
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Publication Date: 28 February 2020
Abstract:

Dear Reader,

As the 21st century unfolds before us and humanity passed the eight-billion mark, global challange to human security are increasing in number and magnitude. The current coronavirus pandemic reminds us that the health- related pillar of human security plays no minor part in this escalation. The pandemic has followed first resport of a novel kind of pneumonia on 8 December 2019. From 31 December, when the outbreak was reported to the WHO, the epidemic was official. Current time courses of morbidity and mortality indicate that an inflection point has not yet been reached. According to a Lancet Global Health report [1], 45 204 cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were confirmed as of 12 February, and 1116 deaths had been reported in twenty-five countries. More recently, the WHO [2] reported 77 923 cases in twenty-nine countries and 2361 deaths as of 22 February.


doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010003 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Annelie Holgersson 1 , Annika Eklund 1, 2 , Lina Gyllencreutz 1, * and Britt-Inger Saveman 1
1 Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
2 Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology, Section for nursing, University West, Trollhatten, Sweden
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 14 April 2020
Abstract:

Responding to mass casualty incidents in a tunnel environment is problematic not least from a prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) perspective. The aim of this review was to 1) categorize preconditions for emergency response in tunnel environments based on Haddon’s matrix and 2) identify specific EMS knowledge of providing prehospital care. Twenty eight articles, reports and book chapters were selected for further analysis. Firstly, sorting the data from each included article was done according to Haddon’s matrix. The result covers human factors, technical factors, physical environmental factors and socioeconomic environmental factors all related to preconditions for emergency response. To describe the EMS’s knowledge the data was also sorted according to command and safety, communication, assessment, and triage treatment and transport, also known as CSCATT. Few studies, especially of high quality, actually provide detailed information regarding emergency response to tunnel incidents and those that do, often have a main focus on management by the rescue service. While many incidents studied were caused by fires in tunnels, thus requiring rescue service in action, the subsequent EMS response issues that have taken place appear to have been given limited attention. To optimize the survival rates and health of the injured, as well as to provide a safe and effective work environment for the emergency services, there is a need to explore the event phase.


doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010016 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Anne Speckhard 1 , Molly Ellenberg 1, * , Haider Shaghati 1 and Neima Izadi 1
1 The International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism, Washington, DC, USA
* Corresponding author
Views 599
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Publication Date: 20 August 2020
Abstract:

Despite the territorial demise of Islamic State of Iraq and Syria [ISIS], their cyberoperations continue to entice supporters. In an effort to disrupt ISIS’s appeal, the International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism has produced over 150 short video clips featuring ISIS insiders denouncing the group, published in over 100 Facebook campaigns in multiple languages and regions. This article details 16 campaigns hyper-targeted at profiles that, based on predetermined and assessed indicators, suggested increased risk of exposure to ISIS-related content. Qualitative and quantitative metrics possibly suggest positive changes in online attitudes and behavior, reducing support and incitement to terrorism.


doi: 10.12924/johs2020.16010030 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 1
Cameron David Carlson 1, * , Troy J Bouffard 1 and Dana Woodward 1
1 Homeland Security and Emergency Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, AK, USA
* Corresponding author
Views 523
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Publication Date: 1 September 2020
Abstract:

Changes in the U.S. Arctic are challenging both the national and human security dynamics of the region. Historically, the region’s significance had been defined by national security concerns, but the emerging concept of human security has come to provide a useful framework through which to define and demonstrate the nexus between the two. This paper provides an overview of the relationship between national and human security and the concerns shared by individuals working in both areas, with a more narrowed focus on the interrelated issues of both food and energy security within the U.S. Arctic. Considering the substantial overlap of aspects of food and energy on both national as well as human security, an analysis of the relationships involving each provides meaningful and extended context of the term “security” for the Arctic region.


ISSN: 1835-3800
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