ISSN: 1835-3800 doi: 10.12924/librello.JoHS

We are committed to a multidisciplinary approach to security analysis. Our associates contribute expertise from such diverse areas as political anthropology, international relations, environmental science, ethics, health care, psychology, economics, and engineering.

The Journal of Human Security (JoHS; ISSN 1835-3800) brings together expertise from universities worldwide and facilitates communication and collaboration between researchers, practitioners and educators. Beyond the academy, the Journal of Human Security aims to connect people interested in all aspects of human security.

Objectives & Aims

The goal of Journal of Human Security is to disseminate applied research into a secure and sustainable future for humanity. It continues the Australasian Journal of Human SecurityJournal of Human Security endeavours to:

  • Provide a forum for researchers to foster interdisciplinary inquiry in broad human security issues such as track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, terrorism, religious extremism, human rights, demographic change, population health, human ecology, sustainable economics and related areas;
  • Inform readers about upcoming events, ongoing and new research projects, trends and discussions, newly published monographs, and available scholarships;
  • Encourage a multidisciplinary approach to issues that have traditionally been viewed as mostly unidisciplinary;
  • Maintain an appeal to a wide readership with both high academic standards and close relevance to practice;
  • Meet international standards of excellence.

Previous content:

In 2013 Librello started hosting the publications of the Journal of Human Security. For the previous content of the journal please use the following links:

2012 Journal of Human Security (Open Access)
2007-2011 Journal of Human Security (at RMIT University Press; pay-per-view)
2005-2006 Australasian Journal of Human Security (at Egan-Reid; pay-per-view)


Latest publications

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18010018 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 1
Luca Guido Valla 1, 2
1 Department of Cognitive Science, Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta
2 “Mihai Viteazul” National Intelligence Academy, Bucharest, Romania
Publication Date: 31 March 2022
Abstract: In the last few decades, the classical concept of national security as related predominantly to military aspects has given way to new elements of analysis. New sectors and actors in the framework of national security took the stage. Starting from the evolution of the concept of national security, this article presents the modalities through which citizens’ perceptions of security issues have been studied to date. Moreover, it proposes a new approach for the exploration of this subject, which could take into account dimensions such as emotional responses to national security threats, which have been rarely systematically investigated.

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18010005 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 1
Suyani Indriastuti 1 , Abubakar Eby Hara 2, * , Himawan Bayu Patriadi 3 , Agus Trihartono 2 and Bagus Sigit Sunarko 2
1 Centre for Sustainable Human Security, University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
2 Department of International Relations, University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
3 Centre for Reseach in Social Sciences and Humanities (C-RiSSH), University of Jember, Jember, Indonesia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 9 February 2022
Abstract: It is widely accepted that tobacco is a threat to public health security. Anti-tobacco norms are intensively campaigned by international agencies, such as World Health Organisation (WHO) and non-government organisations (NGOs). Indonesia has not signed and ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC); however, Indonesian legislation obligates government agencies such as ministries, universities, and the local government to control tobacco use. Meanwhile, tobacco remains one of the central sources of income for Indonesia's state and local economies, a reality that is especially salient for tobacco farmers and labourers. This study aims to examine the extent to which Indonesia internalises the anti-tobacco norm. We focused our investigation on features including norm internalisation and human security, with specific attention to economic and health security. Our study revealed notable ambivalence in the internalisation of tobacco norms in Indonesia. This ambivalence reflects conflictual interests over economic and health security and ambiguity in policymaking concerning tobacco control. Using a qualitative approach, the authors of this study gathered primary data via in-depth interviews and FGD with knowledgeable stakeholders, such as government officials, NGO representatives, health agency workers, farmers, smokers, and academics, and integrated this data with support from the relevant literature. The findings of the present study enrich the existing discussion on norm internalisation, particularly as it relates to tobacco control and other controversial norms.

pp. 1-4
doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18010001 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 1
Sabina Lautensach 1, 2
1 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Human Security, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Human Security Institute, Canada
Publication Date: 9 February 2022
Abstract:

Around the world an increasing shortage of good governance seems to have taken hold. It manifests in the increasing shortfalls on the Sustainable Development Goals and in the worsening polycrisis of the Anthropocene. The UN Secretary-General urged the international community for more infusion of scientifically authoritative models into governance, as well as more collaboration and inclusion of scientists. That goal is not easily achieved in this age of rising kakistocracies.

 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010091 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Theresa A. Ammann 1, * and Tamara A. Kool 2, 3
1 Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University, Højbjerg, Denmark
2 Maastricht Graduate School of Governance, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
3 Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology, United Nations University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 23 December 2021
Abstract: While many have argued for Human Security to integrate a gendered perspective, there is a lack of a consistent approach which hampers the transformative potential that otherwise could be achieved. To better understand how gender has been incorporated in relation to gender, we therefore conducted a systematic review of the literature that combined feminist approaches and Human Security from 1994 (Human Security's inception) to June 2018. In exploring this literature, the following questions were addressed: (a) How is criticism and support of Human Security framed in feminist research? (b) How are gender and feminist research (values) defined in relation to Human Security? (c) Which feminist approaches to Human Security are taken? (d) How do these feminist approaches dismiss or support Human Security and which trends emerge? We found that most studies solely focus on integrating women in the Human Security debate, while men, masculinities, and/or causes of structural inequalities and insecurities remain unaddressed. Studies that address structural inequalities and discuss both men and women come from critical feminist and intersectional backgrounds. We conclude that most gendered approaches to Human Security still need to fully incorporate feminist approaches to be able to truly challenge global gendered inequalities and insecurities.

doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010080 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Edyta Bombiak
Institute of Management and Quality Sciences, Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Siedlce, Poland
Publication Date: 9 November 2021
Abstract:

Security issues and human lives have always been inseparable. The feeling of security is the basic need of every individual. The outbreak of the pandemic has had major consequences for the operation of enterprises and their employees. The latter have faced a new, unpredictable, and rapidly changing situation, which has increased the level of fear and decreased the perception of security. The purpose of the research was to evaluate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the perception of security of young Polish employees. To rate the level of security, the 5-degree Likert Scale was used. Furthermore, an attempt was made to determine whether actions undertaken by employers with respect to employee security improvement have been sufficient, or if it is necessary to expand the scope of support. In the course of analyses, it was established that the pandemic reduced the level of working conditions and economic security and had a negative impact on the physical and mental wellbeing of young employees.


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ISSN: 1835-3800
2012 - 2022 Librello, Switzerland.