ISSN: 1835-3800 doi: 10.12924/librello.JoHS

We are committed to a multidisciplinary approach to security analysis. Our associates contribute expertise from such diverse areas as political anthropology, international relations, environmental science, ethics, health care, psychology, economics, and engineering.

The Journal of Human Security (JoHS; ISSN 1835-3800) brings together expertise from universities worldwide and facilitates communication and collaboration between researchers, practitioners and educators. Beyond the academy, the Journal of Human Security aims to connect people interested in all aspects of human security.

Objectives & Aims

The goal of Journal of Human Security is to disseminate applied research into a secure and sustainable future for humanity. It continues the Australasian Journal of Human SecurityJournal of Human Security endeavours to:

  • Provide a forum for researchers to foster interdisciplinary inquiry in broad human security issues such as track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, terrorism, religious extremism, human rights, demographic change, population health, human ecology, sustainable economics and related areas;
  • Inform readers about upcoming events, ongoing and new research projects, trends and discussions, newly published monographs, and available scholarships;
  • Encourage a multidisciplinary approach to issues that have traditionally been viewed as mostly unidisciplinary;
  • Maintain an appeal to a wide readership with both high academic standards and close relevance to practice;
  • Meet international standards of excellence.

Previous content:

In 2013 Librello started hosting the publications of the Journal of Human Security. For the previous content of the journal please use the following links:

2012 Journal of Human Security (Open Access)
2007-2011 Journal of Human Security (at RMIT University Press; pay-per-view)
2005-2006 Australasian Journal of Human Security (at Egan-Reid; pay-per-view)


Latest publications

doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010080 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Edyta Bombiak
Institute of Management and Quality Sciences, Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Siedlce, Poland
Publication Date: 9 November 2021
Abstract:

Security issues and human lives have always been inseparable. The feeling of security is the basic need of every individual. The outbreak of the pandemic has had major consequences for the operation of enterprises and their employees. The latter have faced a new, unpredictable, and rapidly changing situation, which has increased the level of fear and decreased the perception of security. The purpose of the research was to evaluate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the perception of security of young Polish employees. To rate the level of security, the 5-degree Likert Scale was used. Furthermore, an attempt was made to determine whether actions undertaken by employers with respect to employee security improvement have been sufficient, or if it is necessary to expand the scope of support. In the course of analyses, it was established that the pandemic reduced the level of working conditions and economic security and had a negative impact on the physical and mental wellbeing of young employees.


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010066 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Anna Magdalena Kosińska
Department of International and European Union Law, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Publication Date: 7 October 2021
Abstract:

The aim of the article is to analyze the changes introduced recently (2018-2019) in the national migration law of the selected Member States: Italy, Poland and Germany and to examine whether there exist guarantees of the right to migration security and guarantees for the realization of the principle of migration security priority at the level of national legislation. The second problem under investigation concerns the fact whether the changes introduced in the legislation recently ensure a higher level of migration security in comparison with the previous regulations. Finally, the analysis carried out in the current article is intended to demonstrate whether national law protects the rights of migrants and the receiving society in equal measure or whether certain fundamental rights which migrants are entitled to are at risk of being derogated due to the necessity of providing security to migration processes and the protection of the receiving society. The paper analyzes in detail the legislative initiatives and amendments introduced in migration and refugee law in Germany, Italy and Poland. What is more, the author gathers and analyzes the most representative national case law concerning the asylum and return migration.

 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010057 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Brandy Cochrane 1, * and Lotte Wolff 1
1 College of Law and Justice, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 7 October 2021
Abstract:

This paper explores the everyday security of refugee and asylum-seeking mothers before, during and after irregular migration. Based on narrative interviews with mothers residing in Melbourne, we analyse how their needs both do and do not fall into Nussbaum’s capabilities list. We argue that Nussbaum’s framework is not sufficient to capture the gendered aspects of everyday security related to carework. Based on this analysis, we suggest a new framework to understand carework and everyday security in the context of refugee and asylum-seeking women. Centring carework in the discussion of the everyday security of people seeking asylum is a significant step away from traditional security literature and allows mothers’ voices to be highlighted in a unique way.

 


doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010046 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Marta Sara Stempień
Institute of Security Studies, Siedlce University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Siedlce, Poland
Publication Date: 4 October 2021
Abstract: The article analyses a large content of the English-language magazines Dabiq and Rumiyah. They provide a significant amount of content for research on the role of women (mostly Western) in jihadi terrorism. The author attempts to understand the leading themes related to women and girls exploited in these sources. A major objective is to discover and understand the Islamic State's approach towards women and girls, as well as their role in the self-proclaimed caliphate. To reach this goal, quantitative and qualitative content analysis is used. Research confirmed that both magazines contain special sections for women and interviews with female followers. IS has proved to be relatively tolerant of the inconsistence of its ideology. The author acknowledges that the magazines discussed were inconsistent, or rather variant in the application of its message. This is particularly true to the role of women.

doi: 10.12924/johs2021.17010035 | Volume 17 (2021) | Issue 1
Dorota Domalewska 1, * , Małgorzata Gawlik-Kobylińska 2 , Phuong Hoang Yen 3 , Rebecca K. Webb 4 and Nakonthep Thiparasuparat 4
1 Faculty of National Security, War Studies University, Warsaw, Poland
2 Faculty of Management and Command, War Studies University, Warsaw, Poland
3 Department of English Language and Culture, Can Tho University, Can Tho, Vietnam
4 Faculty of Liberal Arts, Rangsit University, Rangsit, Thailand
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 25 August 2021
Abstract:

Safe space describes a classroom climate that feels secure, supportive, and risk-free so that students can honestly express their individuality and opinions without fear of being the target of violence harassment, or hate speech. In this paper, we examine the relationship between the school environment, individual characteristics and family in shaping students’ perceptions of safe learning environment. The Safe Learning Environment Survey was designed and distributed to a convenience sample of 360 undergraduate students at universities in Poland and Vietnam. Results reveal that neither sex nor family context affect students’ feeling of safety at school. However, there is a high association with nationality in feeling safe at school. Polish and Vietnamese students differ in their opinions why safe space should be enhanced as well as what the teacher and peers’ roles are in shaping safe atmospheres. These findings have significant implications for multicultural classes: understanding the factors that enhance school safety will help to form the collaborative and inclusive environment where students’ performance improves.



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ISSN: 1835-3800
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