ISSN: 1835-3800 doi: 10.12924/librello.JoHS

We are committed to a multidisciplinary approach to security analysis. Our associates contribute expertise from such diverse areas as political anthropology, international relations, environmental science, ethics, health care, psychology, economics, and engineering.

The Journal of Human Security (JoHS; ISSN 1835-3800) brings together expertise from universities worldwide and facilitates communication and collaboration between researchers, practitioners and educators. Beyond the academy, the Journal of Human Security aims to connect people interested in all aspects of human security.

Objectives & Aims

The goal of Journal of Human Security is to disseminate applied research into a secure and sustainable future for humanity. It continues the Australasian Journal of Human SecurityJournal of Human Security endeavours to:

  • Provide a forum for researchers to foster interdisciplinary inquiry in broad human security issues such as track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, terrorism, religious extremism, human rights, demographic change, population health, human ecology, sustainable economics and related areas;
  • Inform readers about upcoming events, ongoing and new research projects, trends and discussions, newly published monographs, and available scholarships;
  • Encourage a multidisciplinary approach to issues that have traditionally been viewed as mostly unidisciplinary;
  • Maintain an appeal to a wide readership with both high academic standards and close relevance to practice;
  • Meet international standards of excellence.

Previous content:

In 2013 Librello started hosting the publications of the Journal of Human Security. For the previous content of the journal please use the following links:

2012 Journal of Human Security (Open Access)
2007-2011 Journal of Human Security (at RMIT University Press; pay-per-view)
2005-2006 Australasian Journal of Human Security (at Egan-Reid; pay-per-view)


Latest publications

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18020023 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 2
Kari Margrethe Osland 1, * and Maria Gilen Røysamb 1
1 Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, Oslo, Norway
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 13 September 2022
Abstract:

An analysis of Community-Oriented Policing (COP) in 12 post-conflict cases suggests that while the concept of COP holds promise of representing a more sustainable approach to conventional post-conflict police reform, among our cases, there are limited examples of successful COP. Rather, our cases reveal that COP is often perceived as much as a surveillance tool to legitimise harsh policing tactics, as promoting human security or serious reforms. The more robust finding, unsurprisningly, is that the levels of trust between the police and communities, and thus the viability of COP, is closely linked to whether the police act more as a service or a force. While the principles of COP are connected to a police service, in the ideal-typical sense, the post-conflict cases we have analysed are closer to the ideal-typical police force. A number of challenges and what seem to make COP more viable across cases are identified, which should be taken into account when COP is implemented in societies where a police force is the predominiant way of policing.

 


doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18020006 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 2
Abda Khalid 1, * and Ingrid Nyborg 2
1 COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad, Pakistan
2 Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norway University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 16 August 2022
Abstract: Gender based violence (GBV) is a heinous crime that Pakistani society is facing. To deal with this menace, both the government and non-governmental organizations have taken steps at various levels to improve police service delivery, competence-building and awareness-raising on GBV, establish women’s shelters, establish women’s development and welfare units in district welfare departments, and open helplines. However, these initiatives are limited, scattered and lack coordination. Our research aims to understand how the introduction of ICT might improve both competence on GBV and the coordination of the mechanisms dealing with GBV. Using a qualitative approach, we conducted in-depth interviews of relevant actors involved in the process of dealing with GBV. Our research findings show that GBV is a deeply rooted and complex structural phenomenon that requires a well-planned, well-coordinated and politically driven strategy. While ICT has the potential to improve competence of stakeholder and processes of reporting, mitigating and preventing GBV, access to technology by rural women is limited. It is therefore important that technological innovations take account of contextual constraints and opportunities.

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18020001 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 2
Ingrid Nyborg 1, * , Shweta Singh 2 and Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv 3
1 Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norway University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
2 Department of International Relations, South Asian University, Delhi, India
3 Centre for Peace Studies, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 16 August 2022
Abstract: This special gender issue brings to the fore a renewed focus on the importance of feminist intersectional analyses in understanding violence and (in)security in the everyday. It does so through the examination of several cases across the globe. The first set of articles examines how gender is understood in the context of police reform initiatives in post-conflict contexts, where despite political peace agreements, many forms of violence and insecurity continue in the everyday.  The second set of articles focuses on gender in populist movement, and particularly foregrounds an intersectional lens. The intersections of race, religion, class, caste, geographies and gender raise important questions when analyzing populist projects, including how the rise of populism may indicate a growing dissonance between the domestic and international, and how this is relevant to understanding the changing nature of violence and (in)security in this changing global era. Taken together, the two sets of articles give a rich account of the significance of incorporating a more complex understanding of gender in gaining better insight into contemporary societal processes.

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.16020165 | Volume 16 (2020) | Issue 2
John-Andrew McNeish 1, * , Arturo Matute 2 , Erika Rojas Ospina 1 and Hugo Frühling 3
1 Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
2 Department of International Development Studies, University of the Valley of Guatemala, Guatemala City, Guatemala
3 Institute of Public Affairs, University of Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile
* Corresponding author
Publication Date: 5 July 2022
Abstract: In this article we discuss the comparative impact and significance of Community-Oriented Policing (COP) in Central America (Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua). We emphasize in particular the formal role of COP as a means to re-establish trust between the state and community, demonstrate professionalism and to evidence the democratic accountability of the police to the population. Although these formal goals remain the goal of community oriented policing, we demonstrate in this article that there has been an increased emphasis on more kinetic or militarized forms of policing in recent years. Hard handed, heavily armed and interventionist police policies have spread from El Salvador to Guatemala, and more recently Nicaragua. Moves towards more aggressive policing are explained by governments and police forces as a necessary response to the rising threat of gangs and drug cartels and horrifying levels of homicide statistics. However, as we highlight there is also evidence of these changes reflecting undemocratic shifts within national administrations and the repositioning of people within government and national institutions with links to these countries' earlier military governments.The net effect of these changes we argue is to erode the intentions of COP initiatives, and severely reduce levels of trust and accountability between people and the democratic state.

doi: 10.12924/johs2022.18010018 | Volume 18 (2022) | Issue 1
Luca Guido Valla 1, 2
1 Department of Cognitive Science, Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta
2 “Mihai Viteazul” National Intelligence Academy, Bucharest, Romania
Publication Date: 31 March 2022
Abstract: In the last few decades, the classical concept of national security as related predominantly to military aspects has given way to new elements of analysis. New sectors and actors in the framework of national security took the stage. Starting from the evolution of the concept of national security, this article presents the modalities through which citizens’ perceptions of security issues have been studied to date. Moreover, it proposes a new approach for the exploration of this subject, which could take into account dimensions such as emotional responses to national security threats, which have been rarely systematically investigated.

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ISSN: 1835-3800
2012 - 2022 Librello, Switzerland.